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today, and it was no more harsh than what bill keller pointed out. you know, what mandela -- he was associatesed with people that did the same things to their people, you know, gadhafi, castro that was done to him. and i think that was one moral failing. >> molly, is there something -- a lesson for the people on the american left for coming out of syria? >> i think syria has been an incredible challenge for the american left. on one hand, we want to claim that we are champions of freedom, but on the other hand, we've been incredibly conflicted as to what to do. do you arm the resist anticipate resistance in syria? do you reject anything that has to do with the american military? the american left didn't know. >> esther, molly, michael, thanks a lot. that is "all in" for this evening. we'll be back on monday. good night. >>> soon after nelson mandela was released it from prison in 1990, he came on a tour to the united states to raise funds here, to raise further support here for the anti-apartheid cause, but also to say thank you to americans who had supported him and supported s
and not by fierce. >> mandela was born 1918 in eastern cape pro-vince, south africa. one of 13 children. he would go on to become a lawyer after a rare education in a white supremacist nation that was explicitly ordered around the oppression and degradation of the black majority of its people. mandela co-founded the youth league of the african national progress dedicated to equal rights and overthrowing the system of apartheid, the racial segregation upon which the republic of south africa had been founded. for this activity, the government armed with a vast secret police branded mandela an enemy of the state. mandela was forced into hiding. in a stunning 1961 broadcast, his first televised interview, the 42-year-old activist spoke with itn's brian woodlake. >> i asked him what it was that the africans really wanted. >> the africans require, want the franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. >> do you see africans being able to develop in this country without the europeans being pushed out? >> we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many races. that there's room
with lawrence o'donnell." >>> nelson mandela told his biographer, men come and go. i have come and i will go when my time comes. nelson mandela's time came today. >> i pledge to you with all my strength and ability to live up to your expectations. i am your servant. i don't come to you as a leader. >> nelson mandela has departed this earth at the average of 95. >> the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they are guided by their hopes and not by the fears. >> that is a man who the world has been waiting to see. his first public appearance in nearly three decades. >> the basic issue is the demand of one person, one vote. >> nelson mandela has become a kind of philosopher king, reflecting on his years of prison and setting on his vision of what he thinks the future of south africa should be. >> i felt very strongly, prison is not the place for anybody. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again, to make decisions not by hate but love, to strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> it is not the individuals that matter. i
nelson mandela at the age of 95. our coverage continues with the ed show. >> good evening, americans and welcome to the ed show tonight. we start with tragic breaking news. former south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leader
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
neighborhoods, schools, and train. in his autobiography mandela reflected on his experience growing up under apartheid. an african child born in an africa only hospital taken in africaon only bus, living in africaon only area, ride africaon only bus, train and be stopped any time day or not and asked to produce a pass. his life with regulations that cripple his growth, dim his potential and stunt his life. this was the reality. against that backdrop, mandela would become the man who neerm si -- nearly single handedly changed the fate changing to multi-p dimensional. he was suspended for participation in a protest, by the early 1950st and '60s mandela had grown political in the leader of congress fighting apartheid. in 1961 he gave his first tv interview. >> the africans prior want franchise on the basis of one man one vote. we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many. following numerous arrests for peaceful protests, anc's protest land mandela in prison for 27 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the government. the terms were notorious and
of the greatest men of our time is dead tonight. nelson mandela passing away today at the age of 95. shortly after his death, south african president jacob zuma addressed the nation. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> south africa and the world in mourning at this moment. world leaders expressing their condolences. president obama addressed us earlier this evening. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against aparthe apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided
, including many women and irn ch. in the end, it killed 69 people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life
there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after
today. >>> good morning. i'm chris jansing. this morning we remember nelson mandela. in life he united south africa and the world and his legacy as a fighter for freedom will continue to resonate well after his death. icon, legend, hero. none of those words seem quite big enough to describe a man who changed the world. ♪ and yet in the streets of johannesburg, the crowds are celebratory. south africa planning ten days of mourning. mandela's body will lie in state with leaders from all over the world expected to pay respects. here in the united states, flags are flying at half staff. mandela had a huge impact on president obama inspiring him to public service. the two only met once in 2005 when president obama was then senator obama. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> mandela spent 27 years behind bars for treason, for backing an anti-apartheid charter. he was finally released february 11, 1990.
our continuing coverage on the passing of nelson mandela. reverend? >> thank you, ed. and tonight, grief in south africa and america and around the world. for nelson mandela. one of the towering figures of this century and the last one. an inspiration for billions of people across the globe has passed away at the age of 95. tributes are pouring in from across the globe for this freedom fighter. this man of peace who helped free south africa from apartheid and inspired citizens of all nations. president obama spoke just moments ago. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. for now let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. may god bless his memory and keep him in peace. >> mandela spent nearly a third of his life as a prisoner of apartheid, b
of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. >>> good morning. i'm ma ra schiavocampo. he's remembered as a man that changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom earned him the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we should have the sa
run down. we will honor and remember the life of former south african president, nelson mandela. his death was not a surprise. he was in failing health for months since being admitted to the hospital six months ago. he is being laid to rest a week from sunday and today people are remembering him as a giant among men. one of the greatest heroes. he was a man in the mold of gandhi and martin luther king. a revolutionary who spent nearly a third of his life behind bars so his country would be free. flags have been lowered to half-staff in washington and all over the country. reaction has poured in from all corners from global leaders to activists to ordinary men and women remembering nelson mandela. >> our nation has lot of its greatest son. our people have lot of a father. >> let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the ark of the moral universe towards justice. >> thank you for the gift. >> what an extroerdary and inspiring man else in an mandela was. >> going from being in prison on the list of many nations and b
ten days. >> mandela will be laid to rest with a state funeral sunday, december 10th. leading up to the service, zuma declared this sunday, december 8th, a national day of prayer and reflection. there will be a massive public memorial at the soccer stadium in johannesburg that hosted the world cup. he'll lie in state for three days at pretoria city hall. flags are at half staff in the capitol and white house as well, which confirmed this morning that president obama and first lady michelle obama will participate in memorial events. the guest list for his funeral will likely include every living u.s. president able to travel along with dignitaries from around the world and celebrities across the globe today, countless newspapers paying tribute. as president obama says now belongs to the ages. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> and this morning, on the "today" show, former secretary of state colin powell who attended mandela's inauguration, shared what he meant to him. >> a
edition of "andrea mitchell reports," celebrating the life of nelson mandela. >> i stand here before you not as a profit but as humble servant of you, the people. >> a giant among then, activist, prisoner, leader, a president, a founding father. for the legions who revered him simple madiba. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. >> my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> by the power of his example demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choorse, how we will respond injustices, grievances, sorrows and tragedies that afflict all of human kind. >> he was an inspiration to generations of freedom fighters. >> we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you. you inspired us. i said new york city, mr. mandela, you inspired us. >> we entered into a covenant, which i billed to society in which all, both black and white, will be able to walk tall w
>>> this sunday, nelson mandela. a special person whose world course changed world events. >> he was a president that embodied that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa t
. we'll have special coverage of mandela's life and legacy he leaves behind including a report from south africa specelebratin the leader. >> he spent 27 years in prison. to the people of south africa what freedom means. >> from argentina to ireland to denmark, his death is front page news across the world. president obama met mandela just once but says he will forever strive to walk in his footprint. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my life without the example mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him. >> today we look not only at how mandela is being remembered but also reflect on how his life's mission will be carried forward. >> often when some great man dies, we say we have to wait the judgment of history. i don't think we have to in his case. we start with michelle kosinski. as i understand the crowd has been gathering because the news of madiba's death came so late in the day. explain how you have seen the crowd swell. >> reporter: right
am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to his own country but all over the world. the long-time freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba as he was known sacrificed decades of his own life in prison in an effort to win his countrymen freedom from the bonds of apartheid. mourning and tributes as you might imagine pouring in throughout the night from harlem to his hometown of johannesburg, south africa. it is all for a man who was prepared, as you heard, to die to bring democracy to a country where for so long it wa
their own sort of memories of nelson mandela. we'll have more on this on "morning joe" which starts right now. ♪ ordinary love >> i build a society in which all both black and white can walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured of their right to human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> it would have been groundbreaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but nelson mandela was so much more. not only to his own country but to people the world over. the freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba, as he was known, sacrificed 25 years of his life in prison so that his countrymen might be free from the bonds of apartheid. >> your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. i, therefore, place in the remaining years of my life in your hands. >> when he was released from prison he was greeted by a crowd black and white and his plight inspired a young college student who would change history himself. >> i'm one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very fir
praised mandela's commitment to humanism and justice. to benjamin netanyahu who called him one of the outstanding figures of our time, to iran's president, rouhani, who praised his belief in the freedom and equality of all humans. pretty much every leader in between. in the u.s. the same thing is happening. emotional eulogies have been pouring in from bill clinton to both presidents bush, from susan rice to condoleezza rice, everyone is celebrating the life and mourning the loss of mandela. even arguably the most conservative member of the united states' senate today, ted cruz, released a heartfelt statement saying mandela live live in history for defenders of liberty around the globe because of his epic fight against injustice, an entire nation is now fre. senator cruz also posted that statement to his facebook page, and that is where the illusion of the bipartisan universally accepted respect and regard for mandela and the movement evaporated. the comment thread that follows ted cruz's respectful eulogy is not pretty. it's just teeming with stuff like this. go home, ted, you'
see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. >> president obama leading our nation in mourning. former south african mandela, his death 24 hours ago was not unexpected but caused a deep sense of loss and outpouring of memories and condolences. he spent 95 years on this earth. 27 of them in prison for treason. he led the crusade against apartheid and for human dignity and reconciliation and won the 1993 nobel peace prize and became the first black president and nation's first democratically elected president and touched millions of lives around the world. mandela compares to dr. king and gandhi as nonviolent agents of change and progress. pope francis said the sted fast commitment in proving dignity and forging a new south africa built on firm foundations on nonviolence should inspire generations to put it in front of their political aspirations. plans are already under way for memorials and of course his state funeral. here in america, flags are lowered at the capitol and th
nelson mandela, heads of state from 89 nations are expected to attend activities and services tomorrow in south africa. this morning president obama, joined by first lady and former president george w. bush, laura bush, former secretary of state hillary clinton all left washington from andrews air force base on "air force one." president clinton and jimmy carter will be meeting them in south africa. president obama will be speaking at tomorrow's memorial service. nbc's ron allen live in soweto. ron, this is a gathering of the great, families, people of south africa all gathering. you have covered this so long. tell me about the emotions as people in south africa prepare? >>. >> reporter: it's an unbelievable atmosphere. we're across the street from the nelson mandela home, the home occupied from 1940s to 1990s. tomorrow is a day that will be unlike any other. there's more than 80 heads of state here. that will surpass the heads of state and world leaders who came to mourn and to say good-bye to pope john paul ii. largest gathering of heads of state outside of u.n. perhaps ever. we'll h
. and many on the right just can't handle it. here's what i'm talking about. >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great injustice and was willing to pay a huge price for that. that's the reason he's mourned today because of that struggle he performed. but you're right. what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obama care is front and center in that. >> yes. he just compared fighting the health care law to fighting apartheid. rick santorum doesn't have to like the health care law, but he's a former u.s. senator. does he really think it compares to government-backed racial segregation. but this is the ugliest we've seen from comparing the law that saves lives to hurricane katrina to saying the law was terrorizing the country. and now senator shutdown is also freaking out. >> we were talking a few minutes ago about obama care
at the marginalized as if they are somehow unhuman. we celebrated nelson mandela. pope francis talks about people who find themselves excluded without work or possibilities or any means of escape. i think it's an odd ideology saying the rich work harder when we throw money at them and the poor work harder when we throw less money at them. there's a disconnect there. >> i'm going to have to leave it there. thank you both for your time tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> good to be with you. >>> ahead, what republicans hope you forget about their views on nelson mandela. including the congressman who compared the great leader to willie horton. >>> plus my interview with the star of "mandela: long walk to freedom." idris elba is in the studio tonight. >>> also, want to know how the gop's outreach to women is going? just listen to rush limbaugh's advice on avoiding sexual harassment. >> you walk up to the woman and say, would you please ask your breasts to stop staring at my eyes. try that. might help. >> outrageous. >>> and which lucky republican is the latest to sign up for obama care? we'll unveil the happy w
. first understanding the impact and importance of president nelson mandela. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. we are going forward. our noorch freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way. >> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. the world lost one of its greatest leaders and agents of social change with the passing of nelson mandela at the age of 95 on thursday. madiba, the clan name by which he was known, transcended the boundaries of south africa as it became synonymous with the country's greatest struggles and triumphs. mandela meant many things to many people, including president obama, who offered this tribute shortly after mandela's death. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> no one can deny the indelible contributions and sacrifices that nelson mandela made and for the people of south africa and ultimately the world. but often when a great leader passes on, what we think we k
. a second storm is forming right now. we're live with the forecast. and beyond borders, how nelson mandela influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you
order. his birth name means pulling branches of a tree and pull he did. president mandela not only freed a nation, he reminded the world of our common humanity. he put the good of the south african people, all south africans, above all else. over the course of his 27 years in prison, mandela wisely used his time to prepare, to plan and to embrace both forgiveness and reconciliation. he learned to let go of hatred for other people, recognizing that one of the true evils of apartheid is how it turned people against one another. in the first press conference, 1990, mandela was himself moved by the broader change that had begun to take place in his absence. >> it's a totally different south africa and along the road i was surprised to see the number of whites would seem to identify themselves with what is happening in the country today amongst blacks. i was absolutely surprised. and i expected that response from blacks but the number of whites seemed to feel that the change is absolutely imperative. >> i had the honor of meeting nelson mandela when he visited the clinton white house for a st
to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. >> nelson mandela long walk to freedom took him right through the united states capitol. at the start of this saturday in december with much of the country locked in a deep freeze. we are thawing out this morning with questions ability some of the new things we've discovered. did you know as recently as five years ago, nelson mandela needed a special waiver just to travel in the united states. we're going to talk about why that was and why it took so long for that not to be the case anymore. there are also always things we know this week, from the wide ranging conversation with president obama, his frustration and disappointment with congress, hills hope in the young people, political leaders of the future. we will talk about that later. progressive leaders are pushing back, fighting back against voices that want them to give in on things like cutting social security and medicare. there is no mistaking that this week. finally, we want everyone to know our weekly current events quiz show "up against the clock," moving to the sec
, nelson mande mandela, the founding president of a democratic nation has departed. he passed on peacefully around 20:50 on the 5th of december. 2013. he is now resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lot of his greatest son. our people have lot of a father. although we knew that this day would come, nothing can diminish our sense of a profound and enduring loss. his struggle for freedom and give him the respect of the world. his humility, his compassion, and his humanity and him they laugh. our thoughts and prayers are with the mandela family. to them we owe a debt of gratitude. they endured much so that our people could be free. our thoughts are with his wife. for mandela, with his children, his grandchildren, his great grandchildren and their entire family. our thoughts are with his friends, comrades, and colleagues. it's over the cause over the last time. our thoughts are with the south african people for today, mourning the loss of the one person who more than any other came to embody their sense of a common nation. our thoughts are with them as their own. and who saw the cause, th
, dignitaries and heads of states who will attend tomorrow's memorial for nelson mandela while senator ted cruz is headlining a group of two dozen members of congress also making the trip. we will get the latest live from south africa next on "now." ♪ ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3 creepy gnomes ♪ 2 angry geese ♪ and a giant blow-up snowman ♪ that kind of freaks me out [ beep ] [ female announcer ] no one delivers the holidays like the u.s. postal service. priority mail flat rate is more reliable than ever. and with improved tracking up to 11 scans, you can even watch us get it there. ♪ you can even watch us get it there. before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than her minimum payment on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit
that maybe some have grown to see the greatness of mandela. maybe they're not just going through the moment and not just playing for the time. the way we will know is not that you just memorialize a great man, but you fight for the things that made him great. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> scared as shut downs. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews up in new york. let the start with this tonight. who didn't fear shutting down the government said that only scaredy cats and wimps did have gotten a case of chicken. name your crazy and he or she if they're still talking at all are not talking about shutting down the government. not this week, not this january. oh, they're still talking trash about killing obama care. still talking about the debt, but guess what. they aren't talking about what they did with such bravado this september to october. suddenly the cat's got their tongue. or is it the calendar. with elections coming next year and those on the right with any iq have noticed the one time the democrats saw their
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
." >> president obama is heading to south africa for nelson mandela's memorial service. when he returns, expect him to refocus on what he says is his administration's target for the remainder of his presidency. a tale of two americas, candidate obama vowed to heal a polarized nation but that is proving increasingly difficult. his first term ended by tieing jouj l george w. bush as the most polarizing year ever. look how far the lines really are. it's no surprise since over the past decade the nation's seen a rise in liberal democrats and conservative republicans, it's which way politics to the fringe or center. we search far and wide to find someone who knows politics and elected as a republican governor and served four presidents including one democrat named obama. and the only name we could come up with is huntsman. yes, that's my dad jon. welcome to "the cycle." we've banished luke to the remote camera so you can be surrounded by beautiful women, a man with five daughters -- >> i have to say, i've been at a lot of tables but never been so intimidated. and so honored, i have to tell you, it's
dozens of world leaders who will honor the late nelson mandela. the president is joined on air force one by former president george w. bush, his wife laura, and former secretary of state, hillary clinton. meanwhile, for families in newtown, some powerful public statements ahead of a painful anniversary. we will listen to their message in a few minutes. >>> also, signs of real steps towards recovery on friday. unemployment fell to its lowest rate since november 2008. white house officials say congress can build on these gains. and that brings us to our top story. president pushing congress to finish the deal on the budget. yes, the season for wheeling and dealing, and not just bargain hunting at the mal. washington lawmakers face their first test since house republicans backed off the government shutdown. that deal, of course, created a new economic deadline, a congressional budget by this friday. so both houses of congress looking to strike their first agreement since 2011. the last two years haven't seen much consensus. the "washington post" is reporting the new deal may provide a cease
, song, and remembrance in honor of nelson mandela. today's national day of prayer and reflection marks the beginning of a week-long program of mourning in his memory. let's go right now to nbc's michelle koh zin ski, who's in the middle of it all. michelle, a good evening your time. what are we seeing? >> reporter: hi, alex. right here this was a fence lined with some flowers outside the mandela property. now it has become several large hills full of flowers lined with people. you can imagine in churches around the world today mandela was mentioned. here today people were basically encouraged to do their own thing, to reflect on the melgszage of this champion of freedom. but in enormous numbers, people felt much better gathering together, includingmembers of mandela's family. it had the feeling of a sunday revival. here a few hundred gathered in a tent at mandela's offices, anything but quietly reflective, full of joy. >> we don't mourn quiet. we need to celebrate. we need to celebrate his life. >> reporter: the gospel choir that performed so many times for mandela in life, felt his lo
of nelson mandela. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> the mind of a leader. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews up in boston. so let me start with this. president obama continues his offense of getting great help from a 7% jobless rate. the best numbers from since the historic financial crisis he inherited back in 2009. and if there's a single powerful insight i got from our time yesterday is that those of us looking at president obama and the man himself are looking at the same reality. we see the right wing attack and obstructing him relentlessly. he certainly sees it. we see the gall of economic justice as the big of our time and so does the president. and so does pope francis in rome. and this economic justice is what's driving him. letting him weather from the right. he wants to help those most in need. but he also said this man who wanted to be a transformational president generally comes when one controls the government. times like the early new deal, the great society, and even the early months of the reagan pr
hearts and minds were focused on the lives of nelson mandela. they took some time out to watch our program with the president. he said at that time when i asked him how do you do big deals and he said history says you only get a big program through, something really important, when one party controls the government. the house, the senate, and the presidency. does that mean to you he's still holding out hopes he can pull a big upset in the sixth year of his presidency next november? >> well, i was certainly struck by the answer in which he was reminding those college students that a lot of them that might vote in a presidential year don't tend to vote in a non-presidential year. but sometimes who's the speaker of the house is a job that's just as important as any other. so i think it's clearly something that's on his mind. and it was something he wanted to be on the minds of those students yesterday. >> can the brilliant get out the vote operation that blew everybody's socks off last november, can you replicate that in a midterm without his name technically on a ballot? >> yeah, and
mandela. more than a hundred heads of state expected to attend. we'll have a live report from south africa next. >>> the have and the have notes. what's really standing in the way of closing the income equality gap. ronann farrow will join me to talk about the 2%. stay with us. [ male announcer ] it's 7am and steve is already thinking about tomorrow. which is why he's investing in his heart health by eating kellogg's raisin bran®. mom make you eat that? i happen to like raisins. [ male announcer ] invest in your heart health with kellogg's raisin bran®. when you don't have the time, there's new crest 3d white 1 hour express whitestrips. removes years of stains in just 1 hour. whitening without the wait. now get the best 3d white deal of the year at selected retailers. now get the best 3d white deal of the year ♪ you know, ronny... folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? i'd say happier than a bodybuilder directing traffic. he does look happy. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on ca
of mourning, south africans reflect on the life and legacy nelson mandela. for the first time, we are hearing from his family on his death. a live report ahead. >>> answering a multibillion dollar question. why the supreme court wanted no part of it and why it might end with you paying a lot more online. an iconic image of a '70s star created by an icon of the art world, why it's not at you the forefront of a bitter legal battle. >>> hello, everyone. it's just past high noon in the east, 9:00 a.m. out west. welcome to weekends with alex wit. powerful winter weather has much of the country in a deep freeze today. the arctic blast carrying snow, sleet and freezing rain stretches from california to the northeast. the storm is already to blame for at least 11 deaths including three in california. icy conditions are making driving perilous. >> it felt like my car was kind of weaving back and forth because it was so slick. >> and texas is one of the hardest hit as icy conditions there force the cancellation of the dallas marathon today as well as 1600 flights at dallas fort worth international birp
to attend tomorrow's memorial service for nelson mandela. also on air force one, former president george w. bush, his wife laura and former secretary of state hillary clinton. former presidents bill clinton and jimmy carter are traveling separately. the only living president not able to attend george h.w. bush, at 89 can no longer travel such a long distance. it will be held in soweto where nelson mandela made his final public appearance in 2010. ron, you have half of the world's leaders gathering, that stadium seats 95,000. it is an open air and presented significant challenges security wise. >> reporter: yes, there's perhaps not been an event like this ever, dare i say, the most comparable is the funeral of pope john paul ii in 2005 where there was 3 million people and 75 or 80 world leaders who attended. this is going to be an amazing day tomorrow. there's a lot of anticipation already. behind me you can hear people in the streets here still singing and dancing and sell bragt the life of nelson mandela. this has gone on constantly since his death was announced thursday night. they are a
headed to south africa to honor nelson mandela. security is tight as the soccer stadium there hosts dozens of the most important world leaders. >>> mary landrieu cast the deciding vote for obama care. >> southern democrats under attack. could republicans turn the state red by picking off a few vulnerable dems? good morning, i'm chris jansing. washington lawmakers getting close to something that almost never happens these days, a deal. they're headed back to d.c. right now to hammer out the details, but this budget agreement may not be much to write home about. the "washington post" basically called the agreement a cease-fire. we don't know many of the details but it's no grand bargain. it doesn't deal with entitlements, the debt or tax reform and probably won't completely fix the sequester, but aides for senator patty murray and congressman paul ryan, the budget chairs working on the deal are at least determined to keep the government open and they think they can get the plan together for a vote later this week. one of the final sticking points in the deal could be unemployment. fri
no, i don't think the president is right. we will not see another nelson mandela. it's not likely in our life time. but we can bring a little mandela in us and become better people in the spirit of nelson mandela. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. up next is a special edition of "hardball." an exclusive interview with president obama. >>> tonight, we bring you to my interview with president barack obama. we present it against the backdrop of the passing of his personal hero nelson mandela. an event which msnbc will be covering for the rest of the evening. i have covered two great world events in my career. one was the fall of the berlin wall in 1989. the other was the first democratic election in south africa five years later. i was there when the country's black majority voted by the millions waiting in lines that stretched from one horizon to the other. i saw first hand the devotion to democracy and the non-violent political change that was the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity and unbendi
been short-changed. quickly, dr. michael eric dyson, i want to ask you about nelson oh mandela. the story that i opened up with tonight was the striking workers yesterday in 130 cities. would nelson mandela have been out with those workers? >> absolutely. this was a man who to the chagrin of many people, even refused to renounce, you know, the taking up of arms against, you f know, the incredible inequality going on there, even though he counselled peace and progressive. he would have been out there with our workers, because he understood the workers are the backbone of any society. if we can't treat them with respect and dignity and grace, then the society itself is built upon a lie. and will not last long. >> michael eric dyson, great to have you on "the ed show." have a great weekend. appreciate your time. thank you. >>> coming up, the opportunity gap. it's widening. the numbers show it. and republicans seem to be pushing more americans over the edge with their policies. >>> plus, the georgia insurance commissioner makes a wrong turn in his obama care analogy, and lands in t
memorial service for nelson mandela in south africa. we are starting with the economy. there have been solid job numbers and major revision for the gd approximate, and a strong end to the week on wall street. it has a bunch of experts predictioning that a steadily improving economy is on the horizon for the coming year. what would that mean politically? health care and obstruction are the clubs are choice for the two parties. they are beating each other up over both issues and both could be problems as well. the economy is the wild card right now. right now things are looking up. on friday we got word that they push the average jobs growth to 189,000 a month. not great, but not horrible. it's an improvement over 2012. unemployment is down to 7% down 18/10 of a point from this time last year and the lowest since november of 2008. we saw a big revision that was up 3.6% in the third quarter. that's a half percentage point better than 2012. there is a caveat. a good portion came from businesses building up inventory. they may end up stocking up so much, they don't need to buy as much. ther
. it was the site of nelson mandela's first speech after his release from prison. mr. mandela's body will lie in state. his body will lie there in state for three days of public viewing. and then his body will travel home. it is expected that jimmy carter, bush the elder, bush the younger will all travel to south africa to pay their respects, to the extent that their health allows it. >>> the scale and burial is expected to match those of pope john paul and winston churchill and people of that magnitude. when dan rather said he should be considered the greatest leader of the second half of the 20th semplg century, that's how viewed. >>> as the details of the arrangements for the next few days emerge, we will bring them to you right here. that does it for us. thank you for being with us. . >>> the world reacts to the loss of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take
mandela today. president obama will be among the tens of thousands attending the memorial. ron allen alive outside his former home in soweto. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. it's another very emotional day here. perhaps a day of preparation for the huge memorial service that will trach place at a soccer football stadium tomorrow that seats some 80,000 people but there will be tens of thousands bs perhaps hundreds of thousands of people trying to be near this place where nelson mandela will be honored and celebrated, his life and, of course, mourned for the loss. today a day of preparation, yesterday a day of reflection and remembrance at churches across the country. people are gathering to pay their respects and to reflect on his life and then as the week progresses after the memorial service tomorrow, mr. mandela's body will lie in state at the union building and on sunday next week, the state funeral, the official funeral in his homeland homeland, very remote part of the country but where he wanted to be buried so, again, an emotional week, a long good-bye, a lot of mourn
's interesting ted cruz is going to mandela's funeral. i think republicans are starting to look beyond their very small base and realize they got to expand to win national elections. the cantor thing was fascinating. >> this was in virginia this weekend talking to about 500 activists, and eric cantor talked about how the republican party needs be fighting democrats not themselves, and he said the republicans need to talk to people where they are. a great stat that i ran across the other day. 232 house republicans, 89% of them white males. white males in the country, 36%. so these republicans are dealing a little bit with that math problem trying to close that gap. >> yeah. >> this meeting where eric cantor talked was fascinating. virginia republicans called at any time advance because they don't want to be retreating. they want to advance. and ed gillespie, mark warner wants to run against him. he's strong. if he jumped in, that would be one of the hottest races in the country. mark warner would be strong and the favorite but a real race. >> mike allen look at the playbook. cut out that box jumpi
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